Glenda Mills

Hope That Doesn't Disappoint

A Secret Place

10 Comments

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Awakening just before daybreak, I quickly dressed, grabbed my bible and headed for the beach. Our family was experiencing the loss of a precious relationship. The ache in my heart was real, yet a song flooded my mind as I walked toward the shore.

“When peace like a river, attendeth my way, When sorrows like sea billows roll; whatever my lot, Thou hast taught me to say, It is well, it is well with my soul.” Horatio Spafford 

The sound of fluttering wings caught my attention as I stepped under the boardwalk. Looking up I saw a dove resting on the ledge of the crossbeam. Deeply aware of the presence of the Lord, I quickly opened my bible to the scripture that came to mind.

“Oh my dove, in the cleft of the rock, in the secret place of the steep pathway, let me see your form, let me hear your voice; for your voice is sweet, and your form is lovely.” (Song of Songs 2:14 NASB). 

Bible scholars believe the Song of Songs is a picture of Jesus Christ and His Bride. To be known and loved by God in such an intimate way is the greatest joy one can ever know.

Psalm 91 also speaks of a secret place. A place seen by One who loves and knows his own… calls us by name… and knows all the details of our lives.

Good Morning Friends! Welcome to our study! Will you join me in prayer?

Father God, we gratefully enter the secret place of the Most High…not because we deserve it, but because of your great mercy and love. I pray you will open our spiritual eyes of understanding and our hearts to receive all that you want to show us through your Word. In the name of Jesus we pray, Amen. 

Here’s the outline for our study:

“Sheltered Under His Wings”
                  Psalm 91

1. A Secret Place
2. A Sheltered Place
3. A Secure Place
4. A Place of Peace
5. A Place of Protection
6. A Place of Promise

When you read Psalm 91, you may notice it has no title or author…. So who wrote the Book? 

During my time of preparation for this study, I learned that Jewish scholars assign un-named psalms to the writer of the previous psalm. If so, then the author is Moses…yet other scholars believe David wrote it. Do you think it matters?

There is no way to know for sure who the author is and we dare not be dogmatic, but it might just be worth looking a little deeper into the psalm to find clues that might help determine who wrote this most beautiful and comforting Psalm.

What’s the story behind the psalm?

Read through the chapter and look for descriptive words or phrases that describe the author’s circumstances. You might also look for cross-references on the side or bottom bar of your Bible that reveal the history and surroundings of the writer.

Why do scholars differ on who wrote the psalm?

One of my favorite sites for Bible Study skills and commentaries is Study Light.

Click here <http://www.studylight.org> and check out C.H. Spurgeon’s “The Treasury of David”. You might also want to check out the opposing view by Adam Clark.

Question for today: Is it important for you to know who wrote Psalm 91? Why?

Let’s talk about it! Please leave a comment below.

That’s all for today, friends. Join us next week when Jamie will post: “A Sheltered Place”.

 

10 thoughts on “A Secret Place

  1. Good morning, Glenda.

    I have a wonderful story about Psalm 91 – it’s long and I won’t put it here, but this is an incredibly precious passage to me and Kevin. The Lord whispered these words to us from several different places and people during Kevin’s miraculous recovery from a near-fatal accident. In answer to your question: Do I need to know who wrote it? No. I am just so glad it’s there. In fact, sometimes it’s nice to have “anonymous” words – then the identity of the author doesn’t influence the words positively or negatively.

    Love this post, Glenda. Praying for your time with the Lord as you work on your study. I’m so glad He meets us wherever we are.

    Blessings,
    Becky

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    • Becky, so glad God saved Kevin’s life from that accident and left him here with you and family to love on! One day, we will have all the time we need to hear all those stories that are piling up in heaven and on earth of God’s stories from his children’s journeys! Til then, so great to continue to connect with you this way. I love your comment about not needing to know who wrote the psalm to be blessed by it. It’s true…until now I’ve not taken time to learn…I guess it’s the teacher in me wanting to dig for more truth?(: thanks for stopping by!

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  2. Psalm 91 tells me how God is a mighty refuge, how He lovingly protects the one who dwells in Him, even though the circumstances are scary. God offers Himself to each of us who loves Him. I’m encouraged that both Moses and David’s lives fit the specific examples of experiencing God’s security. God never changes.

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    • Jeanette, you are right. Both Moses and David lives were good examples of experiencing God’s security through all kinds of difficulties because they both loved and knew The God who never changes! Thanks for dropping by and sharing your thoughts.

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  3. This Psalm has comforted untold generations of believers throughout the centuries with a timeless sense of God’s protection and care. A great place to go when your heart hurts!

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  4. Sweetie, this is going to be a great study.

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  5. Great start to a study that promises to be enlightening and ancouraging. It doesn’t really matter to me if I know the author of the Psalm, although knowing that information may lend additional knowledge about the meaning of the psalm. Blessings on you and Jamie as you prepare for this study.

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